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Cumbria

Cumbria is home to some of England's most spectacular scenery. At its heart lies the magnificent Lake District National Park, whilst to the east and the west there are many other natural treasures for visitors to enjoy. Cumbria encompasses the green and fertile Eden Valley, the golden beaches and historic ports of the western coastline, the great lakes of central Lakeland, the solitude of the North Pennines and the rich beauty of the northern edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

The beauty of the central lakes: Coniston, Thirlmere, Ullswater, and Windermere (the longest in England), combined by with the seemingly endless miles of hills and peaks throughout the region, provide a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts. Walkers, climbers, riders, cyclists, bird watchers and water sports enthusiasts are spoilt for choice when they visit Cumbria. But you don't have to be sporty to enjoy the region.

Some of the most scenic and spectacular sights can be glimpsed from the comfort of a car. One particular route crosses from the central lakes to the western coast via Hardknott Pass. With a gradient of 1-in-3 the road clings tightly to the mountain's side as it winds its way through the pass, but whilst the driver must concentrate the passangers can take advantage of the magnificent views. Another route (A686), on the region's eastern limits, rises from the green and fertile fields of the valleys to climb the rocky hills of the North Pennines. At its crest it reaches the village of Alston, the highest market town in England, where the steep cobbled streets provide excellent views of the surrounding countryside.

Some of the most scenic and spectacular sights can be glimpsed from the comfort of a car. One particular route crosses from the central lakes to the western coast via Hardknott Pass. With a gradient of 1-in-3 the road clings tightly to the mountain's side as it winds its way through the pass, but whilst the driver must concentrate the passangers can take advantage of the magnificent views. Another route (A686), on the region's eastern limits, rises from the green and fertile fields of the valleys to climb the rocky hills of the North Pennines. At its crest it reaches the village of Alston, the highest market town in England, where the steep cobbled streets provide excellent views of the surrounding countryside.

The rich natural beauty of Cumbria is further enhanced by its historical and cultural significance. With such a rich natural backdrop it is no surprise that writers and artists have found inspiration from the land. Indeed it is within his own records that William Wordsworth records the many hours he spent wandering the hillside whilst composing his greatest works.

Cumbria's current tranquillity belies its violent history. Carlisle, the region's most northerly town, still bears many of the signs of its turbulent past. It's impressive sandstone castle and great city walls are a testament to a time when the marauding reivers made frequent and often savage attacks upon the city and its inhabitants. Large scale fortifications were first introduced to the region by the Romans. The Emperor Hadrian had a 73 mile fortified wall built from Carlisle to Newcastle upon Tyne to keep tribal raiders out of the Holy Roman Empire. Although largely in ruins, Hadrian's Wall and its related Museums are now one of the most popular attractions in Cumbria.

Cumbria has a wealth of attractions to visit, including museums, craft centres, gardens, tourist centres, historic buildings and shopping centres. Combined with the picuresque and magnificent natural environment it is no surprise that this is one of the most popular regions in Britain.



 



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